Coquerel's Sifaka


Family

Indriidae

Order

Primates

Class

Mammalia

Range

North West of Madagascar, in areas north and east of the Betsiboka River

Habitat

Dry deciduous and semi-evergreen forest

Life Expectancy

25 - 30 years

Sexual Maturity

2 - 3.5 years

Diet

Leaves, flowers, fruit, bark, and dead wood

Status

IUCN – Endangered, CITES - Appendix I

Behaviors

Coquerel's Sifaka lives in matriarchal groups of about three to ten individuals. It is diurnal and primarily arboreal. Much is known about their behavior from observations in the wild and in captivity. Social Structure: Coquerel's Sifaka spend the majority of its time in areas of just two or three hectares. However, they can live in areas with four to eight. Home ranges may overlap with other groups of Sifaka. They avoid each other to avoid aggression. When friendly Coquerel's Sifakas meet, they greet by rubbing their noses together. Communication: Coquerel's Sifaka use a variety of auditory, visual, and olfactory signals to communicate. 'Sifaka' is a Malagsy name that comes from the lemurs' characteristic "shif-auk" sound. The "shih-fak" call is used to warn fellow group members of a potential ground predator or to threaten enemies or intruders. They are highly territorial.

Adaptions

The skillful arms and the powerful legs of the Coquerel's Sifaka allow them to be able to vertical leap and to climb quickly. They have a very long body and they are often found sitting upright.

Special Interests

Folklore

Conservation

Hunting is a great threat for this Endangered species. The forest of north-western Madagascar is gradually being destroyed by annual burning to create new pasture for livestock, and trees are also cut down to produce charcoal.

Jacksonville Zoo History

Exhibit

African Forest Exhibit Area